Left-Handed Crochet Basics: How To Crochet

Welcome to left-handed crochet basics! This blog series will help you to master all the things you need to know to crochet! As a left-handed person myself, I know how hard it can be to find good help on crocheting! We will start with the most basic stitches and move on to things like how to read a crochet pattern and charts. We will also trouble shoot and cover some issues left-handed crocheters have! I plan to finish out this series with a round up of all of my favorite left-handed crochet resources!

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So to start, you will need to go to your local craft store and purchase a ball or skein of yarn and a crochet hook. I recommend you try a few different kinds of hooks before you decide which you like best, but for now, get what they have available at the store. I recommend a worsted weight (#4) acrylic yarn, and a H/8 (5.00mm) crochet hook. The weight and fiber of you yarn will be on the label. The hook size of your crochet hook will be on the packaging.

Now I will list the most basic stitches for you to practice, with the written instructions, and links to the video tutorial for that stitch.

Chaining

Create a slip knot, insert hook into loop, yarn over, grab yarn with hook and pull through loop. Continue this process until you reach the number of chains desired. See video tutorial, How to Crochet Left-Handed: Chaining and Single Crochet.

Single Crochet

After chaining desired number of chains + 1, insert hook into the 2nd chain from your hook. Yarn over, pull up a loop (2 loops on your hook), yarn over, pull through both loops. See video tutorial, How to Crochet Left-Handed: Chaining and Single Crochet.

How to crochet left-handed: chaining and single crochet.

Half Double Crochet

After chaining desired number of chains + 1, yarn over, insert hook into stitch. Yarn over, pull up a loop (3 loops on your hook), yarn over, pull through all 3 loops. See video tutorial, How to Crochet Left-Handed: Half Double Crochet.

How to crochet left-handed: half double crochet.

Double Crochet

After chaining desired number of chains + 2, yarn over, insert hook into 3rd chain from hook. Yarn over, pull up a loop (3 loops on your hook), yarn over, pull through 2 loops (2 loops on your hook), yarn over, pull through both loops. See video tutorial: How to Crochet Left-Handed: Double Crochet.

How to crochet left-handed: double crochet.

Triple Crochet

After chaining desired number of chains + 3, yarn over twice. Insert hook into stitch, yarn over and pull up a loop (4 loops on your hook), yarn over, pull through 2 loops three times. See video tutorial, How to Crochet Left-Handed: Triple Crochet.

I hope you find these tutorials helpful as you learn how to crochet! Be sure to keep practicing and if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me. Next week we will be covering slip stitching, mistakes/missed stitches, fastening off, and working in the round!

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Sadie Shell Crochet Pattern

Sadie Shell Crochet Pattern

The Sadie Shell crochet pattern is probably my favorite summer make! This crochet pattern was published in 2016 but I’ve recently made myself a new one and I had to share it!

The Sadie Shell crochet pattern uses sport weight (#2) yarn to create this lightweight, lacy, capped sleeved top. For my newest top, I used Wolltraum USA 4 ply in the colorway Das Boot. I purchased it a few years ago and finally got around to using it!

The pattern comes with instructions for women’s sizes XS-2X. You will need to know basic stitches like dc and sc, and slip stitch. The pattern is a bottom-up workup style with no sewing involved! The repetitive stitch combinations are easy to remember and very quick to work up!

You can purchase the crochet pattern on Ravelry and Etsy!

Looking for more summer tops? Check out the Tied and True Tee!

Sadie Shell Crochet Pattern

Summer Stroll Vest Crochet Pattern

This post- Summer Stroll Vest Crochet Pattern-  may contain affiliate links, which means if you make a purchase from the links below, I will get a small percentage of the sales at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your continued support!

Summer Stroll Vest Crochet Pattern

I am all about the basics right now. The Tied and True Tee was the ideal basic tee and now I’ve got the ideal basic summer vest for you! Look great wearing this vest over literally any outfit! It’s a quick workup and only uses basic crochet stitches to create the amazing lacy look!

I used Knit Picks Stroll Tweed for this design. Stroll tweed is a fingering weight (#1) yarn made up of 65% superwash merino, 25% nylon, and 10% donegal. It is a really true tweed yarn and it comes in 20 different colorways! The tweed wasn’t bad to work with. Pulling out my stitches was a bit difficult at times, but that happens with any tweed yarn. The drape on this yarn was amazing! It was super soft and flowy, especially after blocking!

More Pattern Details

This vest does require blocking! I am going to put that out there right now. You will want to block your project to get the length and drape you see in the photos. I wet blocked my vest before I seamed the shoulders together. Since it’s such a lightweight yarn and has such open stitch work it only took about 2 hours to dry.

The Summer Stroll Vest crochet pattern comes in sizes XS-2X. You will crochet the vest from the bottom up with just a tiny bit of seaming at the shoulders. Plus the pattern has pictures on how to fold the vest and where to seam it. You’ll also get the multiples in which the stitches are worked so you can make the pattern as big or as small as you like.

You can purchase the crochet pattern on Ravelry or Etsy!

Corner to Corner (C2C) Crochet Left-Handed

The Corner to Corner, also known as c2c, crochet stitch combo is a fun and quick way to make a square or rectangle. All you need to know is how to chain, slip stitch, and double crochet to create this stitch combo. The corner to corner crochet stitch combo is often used to make blankets, scarves, bags, and more! You can create graphic pictures, stripes, or solid pieces all with c2c crochet!

Today I am sharing with you how to create the corner to corner stitch as a left-handed crocheter. Below you’ll find written instructions, and a video tutorial to show you how to do it. I hope you find it helpful in mastering this fun technique! Once you’ve mastered it, go grab my Sweet Blessings Bible Cover crochet pattern for an easy beginner c2c pattern!

You can find the video tutorial HERE.

Written Instructions:

Rectangle Increasing:

Step 1: ch 5.

Step 2: dc in 3rd ch from hook and next 2 chs. (1 block)

Step 3: ch 5, turn.

Step 4: dc in 3rd ch from hook and next 2 chs, sl st to beginning ch 2 space.

Step 5: ch 2, 3 dc in ch 2 space. (2 blocks)

Step 6: Ch 5, turn, dc in 3rd ch from hook and next 2 chs.  

Step 7: sl st to next ch 2 space.

Step 8: Ch 2, 3 dc in ch 2-space, *sl st in next ch 2 space, ch 2, 3 dc in ch-2 space, repeat from * across. (3 blocks)

Repeat steps 6 through 8 until your corner measures desired length across. The number of blocks will increase by 1 each row.

Rectangle decreasing:

You will start by only decreasing on one side. That side will stay at 9” and the other side will increase to 23”. (Or the width and height of your book, if different.)

Step 1: Ch 3, turn, sl st into next ch-2 space.

Step 2: Ch 2, *3 dc in ch-2 space, sl st into next ch-2 space*, repeat across.

Step 3: Ch 5, dc in 3rd ch from hook and across, sl st into next ch-2 space, *3 dc in ch-2 space, sl st into next ch-2 space*, repeat across to last ch-2 space, sl st only into ch 2 space.

Repeat steps 1-3 until length of increasing side reaches your desired length. Once the other side has reached desired length, you will start to decrease on that side as well.

Step 1: Ch 3, turn, sl st into next ch-2 space.

Step 2: Ch 2, *3 dc in ch-2 space, sl st into next ch-2 space*, repeat across to last ch-2 space, sl st only into ch-2 space.

Repeat steps 1 and 2 until you get to only one block left.

To finish, sl st into last ch-2 space.

Step 3: Ch 1, turn, sc evenly around the entire rectangle, working 2 sc in each corner, join to 1st st.

Step 4: Ch 1, do not turn, 1 sc in each st around, join to 1st st.

For a square, start decreasing both sides at the same time. See video tutorial for demonstration.

Fasten off.

For more left-handed stitch tutorials, go HERE.

Tied and True Tee Crochet Pattern

This post- Tied and True Tee Crochet Pattern-  may contain affiliate links, which means if you make a purchase from the links below, I will get a small percentage of the sales at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your continued support!

Tied and True Tee Crochet Pattern

The Tied and True Tee is the perfect basic tee for summer! This crocheted tee is so lightweight and has amazing drape!

This crochet pattern comes in children’s sizes 2-10 and women’s sizes XS-2X in one easy to follow download! It includes written instructions on how to do the herringbone dc stitch, as well as a video tutorial. You will also get a video showing you how to style the tee, including how to make the knot! The tee is constructed with 2-3″ of positive ease. It is worked from the top down with no sewing required. I just love the slight ruffle of the sleeves! It gives it such a feminine touch!

The top is made with gorgeous, hand-dyed yarn from Montana Crochet! The yarn is a fingering (#1) weight yarn made from 75% merino wool and 25% nylon. It literally feels like a regular t-shirt! Pre-orders for kits for this pattern open on May 20th!

A few other yarns I recommend Lion Brand Amazing Lace or Loops and Thread Woolike. Both of these yarns are a fingering weight (#1), but can be purchased in store and at a lesser cost. I always love to support other small businesses though, so if you can, grab some of that Montana Crochet yarn!

You can purchase the Tied and True Tee crochet pattern on Ravelry and Etsy!

For another lightweight summer tee option, check out the Chevy Tee crochet pattern !

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Free vs Paid Crochet Patterns

If you are a crocheter who uses crochet patterns you will find that there is a huge variety of both free and paid crochet patterns. Crochet patterns can range in price from absolutely free to in the teens for one pattern! This may leave you wondering why some are free, and why some are not. Today I’m going to explain the free vs paid patterns dilemma!

Free vs Paid Crochet Patterns

Free Crochet Patterns

Designers who do not charge for any of their crochet patterns are usually making an income from those patterns in other ways. They are likely bloggers who receive payment for traffic to their site through ads and affiliate links. Often times you will find a free pattern on a blog, with the option to buy the ad-free, printable pdf version of the pattern. This is another way the designer makes money. Having that option at a low cost, for those who want it, provides one way for him/her to make money from that pattern.

Designers who don’t charge for their patterns sometimes work in collaboration with other businesses and get paid by doing that. These designers will design for or work with magazines, yarn companies, big box stores, etc. They get paid by these companies that they work with.

So all designers receive some form of payment for their work. They just receive payment from it in other ways than selling the patterns individually. You can support these crochet designers and bloggers by visiting their site to read their patterns and sharing the links to their blogs and free patterns with others. Also, if there is a product you plan on purchasing, check to see if they are an affiliate. If so, purchase the product using their link. They will get a small percentage back for that purchase, at no additional cost to you.

Paid Crochet Patterns

There are also designers who charge money for their crochet patterns. These designers are usually known as independent crochet designers. Selling crochet patterns is their main form of income. They may also have a blog or website but it doesn’t bring in the revenue that selling their crochet patterns does. These designers may also collaborate with other companies, but they either don’t get paid for it or they are not consistently working with companies to supplement the income they make from pattern sales. For the most part, they just design and sell crochet patterns independently.

You can support independent crochet designers very easily…by buying their crochet patterns! If you can’t buy or are not interested in their most recent release, you can also support them by sharing their work, and interacting with them on social media. The more engagement they get, the more their posts are seen. Which hopefully will lead to more customers and sales! Also, if you cannot buy, do not try to find their paid pattern somewhere on the internet for free. Just don’t do it. Be respectful enough to the designer to let the pattern be a paid pattern.

Why Some Designers Have Both Free and Paid

I can’t speak for all designers, but I will tell you why I have both free and paid crochet patterns. When I first started I was only selling crochet patterns. Ravelry was my go-to place for pattern sales. Those patterns were marketed on Facebook and that was it. I had no need for a blog or ad revenue or anything of the sort. Four years into my business I finally created a blog/website. A year later, I monetized my site with ads and joined some affiliate programs. Because I started out selling patterns, my paid crochet patterns from Ravelry are my main source of income. I have been there the longest and have the most patterns there.

My website does have quite a few free patterns on it. My free patterns are posted on the site to drive traffic to it and to give readers an idea of what my writing and project style is like. But I also like to use this website for informative posts, such as my post on “Crocheting Garments” and “Choosing the Right Yarn for your Projects“. I want my website to be an educational resource for all crocheters to come to for both information and free patterns!

So now you understand the reasoning behind choosing free vs paid patterns. Every designer is working to build his/her business and create a sustainable income doing something they love. Your support means the world to each and every designer you come into contact with! I hope this article helps you to understand how you can be a great help to your favorite designers, even if you can’t spend a dime!

Check out my live show on this topic, and join me every Wednesday at 1pm EST on Facebook and Instagram for a new live show!

Hattie Handbag Crochet Pattern

This post- Hattie Handbag Crochet Pattern-  may contain affiliate links, which means if you make a purchase from the links below, I will get a small percentage of the sales at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your continued support!

Hattie Handbag Crochet Pattern

The Hattie Handbag is the perfect summer bag! This handbag is great for carrying as a purse, taking to the local farmers market, or using it to carry your current crochet project! It’s simple to use and simple to make! You’ll love the change in stitch combos for each row as you make it.

I used Lion Brand Yarn Comfy Cotton Blend to create this handbag. Made of 50% cotton and 50% polyester this yarn is a DK weight (#3) yarn. There are 392 yards in one skein of Comfy Cotton Blend, which means you will only need one skein to make this bag! This yarn comes in both multi-color and solid colors, with 20 total colors to choose from. I chose to make it in this beautiful red colorway, called “Poppy”. It is a very nice, true red color.

This pattern is rated Easy in pattern difficulty. The bag is worked from the bottom up with the handle added at the end. This bag is easily customizable and the size of the bag can be easily changed. Instructions for how to change the size of the bag are in the pattern notes section of the pattern.

You can purchase the Hattie Handbag crochet pattern on Ravelry and Etsy!

Looking for more market bag crochet patterns? Check out the Magnolia Market Bag!

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How to Choose the Right Yarn for Your Crochet Project

Have you ever crocheted a project and it turned out looking or feeling completely different than the picture on the pattern? If this has happened to you, it could be that you didn’t choose a good yarn for that specific project. Today I want to share my best tips for choosing the right yarn for your crochet project.

Choosing the Right Yarn for your Crochet Project

When possible, use the same yarn as the designer.

For the absolute best case scenario, use the same yarn as the designer. Most patterns and/or their Ravelry listings will tell you exactly what yarn was used for the sample project. If you want your project to look and feel almost exactly like the designers, you’ll want to use the exact same yarn. I say when possible, because I know it’s not always easy to get the same yarn that was used, but if you can I promise it will be worth it.

If you can’t use the same yarn, at least use the same yarn weight.

I totally get that it’s not always possible to use the exact same yarn as the designer. Sometimes I would much rather buy something new or use something that’s in my stash already. So, if you aren’t going to use the same exact yarn at least use the same weight yarn. If the pattern calls for a sport weight (#2) yarn, it is not going to look and feel the same if you use a worsted weight (#4) yarn. Plus, you may run into gauge and fit issues because of the difference in thickness of the yarn.

Choose the same or similar fiber content as the designer.

Another way to ensure the same look and feel of the project is to choose a yarn with similar fiber content as the designer used. It doesn’t have to be exact, but if the designer used a cotton blend, it would help if you used a yarn with cotton in it. Combining the same weight with a similar fiber content is going to get your project to turn out super similar to the designer’s sample.

Choosing the Right Yarn for your Crochet Project

What about choosing yarn for something you are designing or creating yourself?

If you aren’t going off of a pattern and are creating something on your own, choosing the right yarn is still important. When creating a wearable, do you want it to keep you warm or be cool and breathable? If you are not creating a wearable, does it need to be sturdy? But soft? These will all have a factor in the yarn you choose. A bulky weight yarn is going to be much warmer than a sport weight yarn. Certain fibers are going to be softer than others. So take all of this into account when choosing your yarn.

I also recommend creating swatches of a few different yarns when making your choice. This will allow you to see and feel how the yarn works up, how it looks with the stitches you have in mind, and how well it drapes. From their you can decide what yarn you think will work best with your project.

Sometimes it will take some trial and error to get the right yarn for your project. I used to be afraid to use lighter weight yarns, so I’d use worsted weight for every project, even the ones made for summer! Then I discovered fingering weight yarn, and I don’t think I’ll ever go back to using worsted for spring and summer designs! With time you’ll be able to quickly figure out exactly what type of yarn you want to use for your projects!

For more information on the lightweight yarns I am loving for spring, check out the post Five Yarns I am Loving for Spring!

How to Choose the Right Yarn for your Crochet Project.

Herringbone Double Crochet Stitch Tutorial

Herringbone Crochet Stitch Tutorial

The Herringbone Double Crochet Stitch is one of my favorite stitches. It is fun to work up, provides a good coverage, and makes an awesome looking project! I have used the herringbone double crochet stitch in many of my crochet patterns including the Aspen Tunic, the Stacy Tee, and the Layla Tunic! Since it provides good coverage, and the stitches are pretty tightly woven together, so it’s great for garments!

Below you will find a video stitch tutorial for this stitch. This is a left-handed stitch tutorial. Although, you can still benefit from this tutorial if you are right-handed. The steps are exactly the same. You will just be working in the opposite direction as the video.

You can find my other crochet stitch tutorials HERE.

Kellie Cowl Free Crochet Pattern

The Kellie Cowl is another one-skein wonder that you can use any yarn in your stash to make! This cowl takes 200 yards or less of yarn! It has a light lacy stitch combo to it and can be made in any size you prefer!

You can purchase the ad-free, printable pdf on Ravelry!

Materials

  • 200 yards or less of any weight yarn
  • H/8 (5.00mm hook)
  • Measuring tape
  • Tapestry Needle for sewing ends together and weaving in loose ends.

Difficulty

  • Beginner

Gauge

  • Row 1 should be approximately 10”

Sizing

  • 28”x10”

Pattern Notes

  • Pattern can be used with any weight yarn and made to be any length or width.
  • To adjust width, chain in multiples of 8 + 6.
  • For more length, just continue to work your rows until desired length, ending on Row 3.
  • Instructions are for #2 weight yarn, with additional guidelines for #3 and #4 in parentheses.

Stitches Needed & Abbreviations

  • ch-chain
  • sc-single crochet
  • dc-double crochet

Cowl

Ch 46 (46 for #3, 38 for #4)

Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook, *ch 1, skip next 3, (dc, ch 1, dc, ch 1, dc) in next, ch 1, skip next 3, (sc, ch 3, sc) in next, *repeat across to last 4 chains, skip 3, (dc, ch 1, dc) in last. (28) (28 for #3, 23 for #4)

Row 2: Ch 1, turn, sc in 1st , ch 1, sc in next, * ch 5, skip {ch 1, (sc, ch 3, sc), ch1}, sc into next dc, sc in next 2 dc*, repeat across, sc in last. (43 sc and ch) (43 for #3, 35 for #4)

Row 3: Ch 1, turn, sc in 1st, *ch 1, skip 1, (dc, ch 1, dc, ch 1, dc) in next, ch 1, skip 1,( sc, ch 3, sc) in ch 5 space*, repeat across to last 2, skip 1, (dc, ch 1, dc) in last. (28) (28 for #3, 23 for #4)

Repeat rows 2 and 3 until you reach 28” or desired length, making sure to end on a repeat of row 3. Leaving a long tail for sewing, finish off. Stitch the starting chain and the last row of your scarf together, creating a circle. Weave in ends.